The OQO odyssey – Part 4

This article is part of the OQO odyssey series – You can find the previous posts here, here and there.

If you think, the rest of the installation would be a cakewalk, you are under a misapprehension. But let’s talk about it one after the other.

I should start my report at kernel level which was the first big thing as I haven’t seen the WIFI Card or the Ethernet controller on the pci bus. But where is it? The answer is USB:

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The OQO odyssey – Part 3

This article is part of the OQO odyssey series – You can find the previous posts here and here.

In general, installing linux shouldn’t be a great problem – I guess those were my words right before powering up the umpc again for starting the bootstrap process as I used to do. But I have missed several things: Battery and heat. The case of the oqo acts as a passive cooling element and got that hot I wouldn’t dare to carry it with me in a bag. As I said the oqo’s a hot thing, I wasn’t thinking of that.

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The OQO odyssey – Part 2

This article is part of the OQO odyssey series – You might want to read Part 1 first.

As the windows installation was finished, I am adding my default software set containing Firefox, Thunderbird, OpenOffice, Antivir and some Sysinternals-Tools.

But if you remember the first article about the installation, I have left 15 GB for a Linux installation on that UMPC. The gentoo LiveCD will be just fine for this job. For better readability, I recommend using the gentoo-nofb kernel. A positive side effect might be, that the unknown hardware will surely handle the common terminal.

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The OQO odyssey – Part 1

Everything started with a package from japan. I bought an OQO Model 01+ on ebay, a small UMPC – The disc was wiped, but the recovery cd was available. Hey, that’s the perfect geek toy! As I opened the box, I discovered, that the power cord was missing.

If this is the worst thing happening, I’m happy – so I went out for buying a power cord, plugged it into the charger and so on. The battery of the OQO started blinking. We’re charging.

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